Giant's Pawsway Saint Berdoodles

  Contact Us via Email      Located 35 minutes southwest of Chicago, IL

What do you get when you cross a Saint Bernard with a Standard Poodle?

~ A Saint Berdoodle~

What does that mean?  They are sweet, lovable, unique, attentive, intelligent, lazy, loyal, people-loving, 90-130# lap dogs!

It's the event you have been waiting for. 

Your new baby is coming home!

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You will need to purchase: 

1. Dog food and water bowl (NOT ELEVATED)

Your puppy is being fed Blue Buffalo Large Breed Puppy Food.  

Directions: 1 cup at least 3-4 times a day depending on your puppies

       activity level and your vet's recommendation

2. XL crate with adjustable divider to move as s/he grows

3. Bully Sticks, plenty of chew toys (NEVER RAWHIDE),

4. Slicker brush & wide tooth comb

5. Ear Cleaner from VETERINARIAN (GENTLE FORMULA) and cotton balls

6. Puppy Shampoo - We use Honest Company Pink Grapefruit Dish washing Liquid, about 2oz poured in a pitcher of warm water and swish your hand around.  First rinse the puppy with slightly warm water, then pour the pitcher with the soap mixture over his back and belly.  Scrub and rinse.  Use a washcloth with just water to wipe his face.  Clean Ears BEFORE bath!   

Also, have plenty of towels in the dryer during bath time so they are nice and warm.  You may blow dry them on warm or cool. 

7. Also choose a high quality treat to reward successful pottying.

8. Name Tag that will attach to the collar we send. 

9. Nature's Miracle Odor Eliminator or another "accident" cleaner 

10. STOCK UP ON PAPER TOWELS! 

We supply your collar & puppy leash!!!  Your puppy will come with the collar and leash taped to the top of the kennel inside with the paperwork (vet check, shot records, fecal clearance).

YOU WILL NEED TO SCHEDULE A VETERINARIAN VISIT WITHIN 3 DAYS OF HOMECOMING!

  • Usually, your pup will bond most strongly to whoever brings him home from the breeder, shelter, airport or store. So if you want your puppy to be attached to your children, have your kids go with you. If this is going to be your dog, you need to be there if at all possible.
     
  • Missing this step is not a crisis, but it is such an easy way to start to connect with your new dog that you should try to use this unique moment for good if you can.
     
  • Your new puppy can ride home in the back seat on a passenger’s lap or in a crate but not loose in the car (and it’s not the day to introduce the harness/seat belt). If you’re on your own, then crate him –for his safety and yours.  We know, it’s tempting to want him loose in the front seat or on your lap, but please don’t. 
     
  • If his crate fits on the front seat and you can buckle it into place securely, feel free – if the passenger side airbag can be turned off or isn’t strong enough to damage the crate you have. Only you can determine this.
     
  • Expect him to bark and cry a bit, that is normal. Sometimes covering the crate helps or giving him some delicious chew toy-- but not always. Don’t be angry – his whole world has changed and he needs time to get to know you and adjust.
     
  • Bring along SENSITIVE FORMULA BABY WIPES, extra towels, paper towels, plastic bags, newspapers and a pet odor neutralizer spray. Hopefully you won’t need the cleaning supplies, but if you do, you’ll be glad you brought them along.
     
  • You puppy will come home with a collar and leash taped to the inside of the crate on the top.  
  • Place the collar on the puppy when you take him/her out of the crate.

 

  • And yes, keep the leash on as well, because puppies are squirmy and holding the leash can mean the difference between a scary moment and a safe one. Also, bring along a bully stick. You can hold the rawhide as your pup works on it.
     
     
  • Your puppy may get car sick on the way home. Watch for nose pointing toward the floor, wrinkled lips, and drooling. Heaving is usually not too far behind. Laying a towel below the puppy can make cleanup easier. Again, covering the crate may help, and go easy on your turns and stops.
     
  • If you must stop for a walk on the way home, go to unused areas. Your puppy is probably not fully vaccinated yet, so stay away from the pet rest areas, where many dogs have been. Instead carry him (if you can) to a more remote end of the rest area and set him down there. Carry him back. And please, pick up after your pup. We all need to scoop, but with a new pup, who may well be carrying a parasite or two, it is especially important.
     
  • Lastly, come straight home. This is not the time to leave your puppy in the car if you can help it or to stop off for a visit with friends. Keep things calm and simple, he’s already having a stressful day.

 

When You Get Home -DON'T DRIVE TO THE HOUSE!  STOP AND WALK PUPPY HOME FOR ABOUT A BLOCK.


  • STOP A BLOCK FROM YOUR HOME AND TAKE HIM OUT OF THE CAR.  HAVE SOMEONE WALK HIM TOWARDS THE HOUSE ON THE PUPPY LEASH.  IT MAY TAKE SOME COAXING BUT THE PUPPY SHOULD BE INTRODUCED THIS WAY.  FORWARD MOTION HELPS GIVE PUPPY A SENSE OF HOME.  DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP.  IT IS NOT UNCOMMON FOR THIS TO TAKE 30 MINUTES AS PUPPY HESITATES.  JUST KEEP WALKING TOWARDS THE FRONT DOOR.  LET PUPPY WALK IN THROUGH DOORWAY. 
  • He probably has to go to the bathroom. Walk him around the outside area you’ve chosen for his bathroom or put him in the inside area with papers and give him some time. He’ll be distracted at first, but usually nature calls quite quickly.
     
  • Some puppies may race around the house in overstimulated overdrive, others will curl up underneath something and watch their new world wide-eyed. Imagine if you were suddenly whisked away to a world you had no idea existed, adopted by beings you’d never met before, living in a place with machines and landscape you neither understand nor could previously imagine.

     
  • Some puppies from who have been flown to you in cargo may arrive sleep deprived, so don’t be surprised if they fall into a deep slumber that first night, giving you a blessedly quiet evening. Enjoy it – tomorrow when they are all rested they may well discover their lungs.
     
  • Don’t be in a hurry to introduce your new puppy to your other pets. There’s plenty of time for them to learn to get along, and it’s always better to take introductions slowly, so that all involved have time to adjust to each other. Crates, baby gates, and exercise pens are all helpful for giving pets the opportunity to see and smell each other without being in each other’s space.

 

Mistakes Happen

  • It is common, normal and rather expected for your puppy to have an accident or two the first few days. You’re both learning about each other.
     
  • Get him out as often as you can – every half hour or so when he is out of confinement.
     
  • Go out with him – praising and rewarding for going outside and he’ll soon catch on.
     
  • Baby puppies, under sixteen weeks, have little muscle control. Most can’t help it when they go, so please don’t be angry.
     
     
  • Keeping a schedule of when your puppy eats and when he pees and poops can be a big help for preventing accidents and getting you on the road to successful housebreaking. This will help you get to know and anticipate when your puppy needs to go out, so that you can create success and rewardable moments, which will in turn bond your puppy more happily and closely to you.

  OTHER BEGINNING TIPS 

PREVENT BEGGING BY NEVER GIVING TID-BITS FROM YOUR PLATE, IGNORE ANY BEGGING UNTIL PUP SETTLES DOWN THEN PRAISE QUIETLY.
TEACH YOUR PUPPY TO LIE IN HIS BED WITH A BULLY STICK OR CHEW TOY DURING MEALS


DO NOT LEAVE FOOD LYING AROUND


WHILE YOUR PUP IS EATING ADD MORE FOOD TO THE BOWL WITH YOUR HANDS, POP YOUR HANDS IN FREQUENTLY WHEN THEY ARE EATING TO GET HIM USED TO HANDS IN HIS FOOD AND TO AVOID FOOD AGGRESSION LATER ON


NEVER CHASE OR SHOUT AT A PUPPY - IT REWARDS WHATEVER BEHAVIOR YOU ARE ANNOYED WITH


GREETINGS SHOULD ALWAYS BE CALM, IF PUPPY JUMPS ON YOU TURN YOUR BACK TO HIM AND FOLD YOUR ARMS. DO NOT TALK, TOUCH OR LOOK AT YOUR PUPPY UNTIL ALL 4 PAWS ARE ON THE GROUND OR HE CHOOSES TO SIT. THEN QUIETLY SAY HELLO, PET HIM AND GIVE HIM PRAISE OR A TREAT.  EVERYONE NEEDS TO FOLLOW THIS PRACTICE OR YOUR WILL HAVE A DOG THAT JUMPS ON YOU TO SAY HELLO! 


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